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Category Archives: Academia

First Issue: Canadian Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences is Live

Open access is a hot topic for academics. Recently, SavageMinds has raised questions about the ethical use of pdfs. Jason Baird Jackson has pleaded passionately (and frequently) for more open access books and journals. And, Quentin Mackie has reminded us of the utility of a great regional journal like BC Studies, which has recently open […]

Double Ended, No Headed Moose and More from Congress

I had a great time at Congress10 in Montreal last week. More properly, I attended the meetings of the Canadian Anthropology Association (CASCA) which happened to be meeting with Congress. As previously noted, I was part of a round-table discussion of applied anthropology. Our panel discussed the following, pre-distributed questions: 1) What questions are being […]

Canadian Anthropology Meetings (CASCA)

I’ll be attending the Canadian Anthropology Society meetings (CASCA) next week. I am part of a round-table discussion on practicing (applied) anthropology. From the session abstract: This roundtable is aimed at sparking a dialogue with/between anthropologists who are practising largely outside academia or within academia but within a largely applied context … The roundtable will […]

Capilano U Archaeology Field School

I had the pleasure of visiting the Capilano University Archaeology Field School at one of their sites in the Seymour watershed (North Vancouver) this morning. In its twelfth year, and always under the direction of Bob Muckle, the Field School is unearthing a Japanese history in the forests of Vancouver’s north shore. The site is […]

Canadian Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences

Douglas College and its Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences are pleased to announce the launch of an online journal. Called the Canadian Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, this journal represents a new form of academic publication and discourse. We seek articles that promote multidisciplinary debate about issues across the humanities and social sciences. […]

Renewing FieldNotes

Right: Klappan Mountain, northwestern, BC (Aug 2009) After a year away from blogging, I am ready to start again. I want to continue blogging about aboriginal rights and issues in British Columbia. But, I also want to blog about two specific topics: 1) I am starting research and writing related to the reader comments on […]

Taiaiake Alfred’s Review of Widdowson and Howard Generating Discussion

The review of Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry by Widdowson and Howard is generating discussion. See the comments in this previous post.

“A Proposal for Taiaiake Alfred: Stop Believing and Start Thinking”

Albert Howard and Frances Widdowson offer a lengthy critique of Taiaiake Alfred’s review of their book Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry. The critique is embedded in the comments section of a previous post here on Fieldnotes. The first paragraph reads as follows: Taiaiake Alfred has a right to his opinion about our book, and we would […]

Taiaiake Alfred’s Review of Widdowson and Howard’s Disrobing

University of Victoria Aboriginal Governance Professor Taiaiake Alfred reviews Widdowson and Howard’s Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry. Much of the review takes on Widdowson and Howard’s Marxist inclinations. He writes: Evidently, Widdowson and Howard get up in the morning and eat a dog’s breakfast of outmoded communist ideology and rotten anthropological theories washed down with strong […]

Good Examples of Bad Ethnographic Experiences?

A student asked me recently for examples of ethnographies in which the anthropologist ‘had a bad time’. He observed that in all of the anthropological writings he has read, the anthropologists generally present themselves and their experiences positively. I was stumped. The ethnography for the course, a survey of Canada’s first peoples, is Robert Jarvenpa’s […]